The Art of Travel

Sainte Chapelle stained glass windows ~ Photo: Sara Roizen
One’s destination is never a place, but rather a new way of looking at things.   Henry Miller
My husband and I just returned from a week and a half adventure in Paris and Amsterdam. I had been to both places before a number of years ago, but felt that I was able to see the two cities with new eyes – as if I had never been before. 
While moving through the streets, cafes, museums, and historical sites I often felt as though I was walking through a dream. I couldn’t soak up enough of the cobblestone streets, the old architecture, and the way the modern life intersected and mingled with the history. At times I fought jet-lag and exhaustion from our seemingly endless walking, and I noticed that my moods were predictably unpredictable each day, with a kind of ebb and flow. This was not one of those relaxing-on-the-beach vacations and each day was packed. However my husband and I (as usual) found a wonderful balance to each day, with one or two sites/activities planned but surrounded by the unexpected and unplanned. If we were on our way to a museum and happened to get pulled down a medieval street for a few hours, that was just as it should be. 
Subway map drawing ~ Photo/Art: Sara Roizen
The opening quote for this post captured the essence of travel for me. It was less about the specific destination, and more about seeing with fresh child-like eyes. A wonderful effect of travel for me is coming home (in this case to NYC) and seeing my own city from a different perspective. My husband is a photographer, and on his way to work yesterday he realized that he was looking at NYC with the eyes of a tourist and visually framing the various scenes that he would photograph if he had never been here before. They were sights that he passed by daily on his way to work, but had taken little notice of before. 
‘The Thinker’ at the Rodin Museum, Paris ~ Photo: Sara Roizen
In the past few days since being back I have been thinking a lot about how I can nurture this fresh way of seeing. I began thinking about the Zen concept of ‘beginner’s mind’ and how I could apply this to my days. One way of slowing down to see things is to draw, paint, or photograph them. To sit down for any length of time in front of an object or scene and really sketch is an automatic way of seeing it more closely.

I also thought about a Julie Cameron’s book The Artist’s Way. I read it years ago, and one of the main prompts that has stayed with me is what Cameron calls ‘the artist’s date.’ An artist’s date is a time you have set aside for yourself (ideally at least once a week) when you do something by yourself and for yourself that delights the inner child and artist within. It does not have to be art related per se, but anything the inspires you and pushes you to try or see something new. It does not have to be time consuming, expensive, or elaborate and for that matter you don’t necessarily have to leave home each time. For example, you could create a small sculpture that is made entirely from recycled items, peruse a used book store and grab a few books that entice you, or sit quietly in a cafe with a type of tea you have never tried before.

The choices are endless, and so are the opportunities to see each day with the eyes of a traveler…even without leaving home.
Notre Dame, Paris ~ Photo: Sara Roizen
Adam soaking up the Louvre with his camera ~ Photo: Sara Roizen
Sacre Coeur, Paris ~ Photo: Sara Roizen
Amsterdam ~ Photo: Sara Roizen
Ferris wheel in Paris ~ Photo: Sara Roizen